04.10.2011

What a great sleep I had last night. I didn't wake until after 7.00am. I hope this is a sign of things to come. A nurse was in my room by 7.30am taking my blood pressure, pulse and blood oxygen level. This will be a daily occurrence. I also got a chit outlining all the tests I was to have today (blood for PSA and a swag of other things, lung function and ECG).

One of the first things I noticed when I sat in the garden terrace and joined in conversations with others was how willing and open they were to talk, especially
about their illness. It's an obvious point, but one still worth making, that people who find their way here to Germany are very accepting of those other therapies we call complimentary in Australia.

Food is an important part of the therapy at the clinic, but it is not anywhere near as strict as is the Gawler Foundation diet. Here there is dairy, sauces and sugar. Some of the food tastes quite salty. They tolerate smoking by patients, and staff. Their emphasis is definitely on the hyperthermia and complimentary therapies like massage, magnetic field, oxygen therapy, and ozone infusion. Chemotherapy in varying
strengths is used extensively for those undergoing full body hyperthermia.

This afternoon I had my first local hyperthmia session. It was on my stomach where I have some remaining lymphatic system tumour. For this treatment you lie on a water bed (very comfortable) and the heating device is positioned over the area to be treated. The arm, which has the heating device attached to it, is clamped into position. I could hardly feel any warmth. The energy which is delivered by the device can be regulated, depending, amongst other things, upon the nature of the cancer, it's location and the tolerance of the patient.

05.10.2011

Today was a full round of treatments and tests: local hyperthermia for my prostate, magnetic field therapy over the prostate region, oxygen therapy, ozone therapy, back massage and ultra sound. During the hour I'm having the local hyperthermia I like to do a visualisation in which I see the heat destroying the cancer cells. I can achieve quite a good meditative state. While having this therapy oxygen is ingested via tiny tubes placed in the nose. The ozone therapy involves taking a quantity of blood intravenously, saturating it with oxygen and returning it to the body via the same way it was extracted. Magnetic field therapy involves lying in a cylinder about 25cm wide for half an hour. I placed my hands in the cylinder in the belief that if it was good for the cancer it may have some beneficial effect on the osteoarthritis in my finger joints.

I'm enjoying the meals and the conversations that go with them. There are a lot of nice people who have cancer. It's particularly disturbing to see so many young people at the clinic, both male and female, but predominantly women. I heard a
disturbing conversation today: one of the patients from the USA was asking other patients from there if they knew of an oncologist in the US would be prepared to treat him after returning home. Apparently, those who come here from the US find it near impossible to get follow up treatment when they return home because US oncologists reject the German system. It does sound like personal and professional prejudices being put before patient care. I would like to think that this attitude does not exist in Australia.

While on my walk this afternoon I tasted the mineral water from all three spas. The lithium spa is by far the most preferable. This seems to be the view of everyone I've spoken with.

Dr Herzog came to my room tonight to let me know he would discuss my treatment plan with me tomorrow.

There was some discussion today about how much cheaper it is to become an out-
patient. That is, live in a nearby hotel and pay for all treatments on an item by item basis. I'm thinking about it, but will not make a decision until after I discuss my treatment plan with Dr Herzog tomorrow.

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